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How is tinting done
26/02/2016 às 03:21

There are three major ways to achieve tinted windows:

OEM tinted glass is tinted within the glass, as part of the actual glassmaking process. It lasts the life of the glass. OEM tinted glass usually has only a mild tint that is legal even in the most stringent areas. Keep in mind that OEM tinted glass may be more expensive to replace in a collision.

Film tinting is by far the most popular aftermarket method. A thin tinted polymer film is applied very carefully to specially prepared window glass. The film is available in many different shades of tint and outward appearances, such as flat, reflective, metallic, or even mirrored. Advantages of film tinting are that it’s very inexpensive, and installers claim that it also might help prevent glass from shattering in crashes. Disadvantages are that the film tinting will only typically last five years before cracking, peeling, and bubbling of the plastic film occurs, and also sometimes yellowing or degradation of the tinting itself. Removal of old window film is more difficult than the installation itself.

If you have a shop do the work, make sure they’re approved through an industry group such as the International Window Film Association (IWFA). Also, check that they always use the same brand of film (3M and Johnson are two of the major brands), and that they fully support the manufacturer’s warranty.

You might be tempted by tinted window films — the type available at discount auto parts stores and department stores — claiming easy “stick-on” installation and only requiring scissors or a razor blade for installation. Beware that these solutions sometimes end up with bubbles or wrinkles and rarely end up looking professionalImagem bloqueada!, and again, removal is usually more difficult than installation.

Coating tinting applies a special tinted solutionImagem bloqueada! to the existing glass, usually as a spray. This type of tint lasts much longer than film tinting, though there are few shops who do it for automotive glass because if properly done it requires removal of the window glass.
 



Comentários



How To Avoid Getting a Bad Vinyl Wrap
26/02/2016 às 03:20

Vinyl Wrapping is a Form of Art

Every act, especially when it comes to designing, decorating or changing the appearance of a person, good or vehicle, is a part of art. Art needs perfection and professionalism. You can’t just go around it at your own wish. It needs expertise and experience.

The best way to avoid getting a bad wrap on your vehicle is by avoiding shops that have little experience in vinyl wrapping and has no affiliation or certification that states the shop (or shop workers) have the ability to wrap cars and trucks. Yes, there are many vinyl wrapping shops who want to find the money in your pockets, though they don’t deliver what they promise and boast of.

Vinyl wrapping is not a cheap process that can be done by just any regular person. It takes time, patience and talent. Wrapping is not a task that any amateur can perform.

A vehicle is such a lovable thing for so many people, which is why they are ready to spend money on the look of their cars, trucks, and SUVs. A properly wrapped car can get you a lot of attention, but if it goes wrong, you will only see laughing faces all around. Believe it or not, a great looking car even enhances your driving experience. It’s not always the gears or engine that matters.

Authentic Vinyl Wrap Shops Are Recommended

It is therefore suggested that one should visit shops that have the most hi-tech/advanced machines and well trained technicians for vinyl wrapping. A bad vinyl wrap occurs mainly due to cheap material usage or lack of talent. Shops that have exceptionally low prices for vehicle wrapping, use those materials and have such kind of labor, because their motto is not perfection, their motto is to bring customers and fetch money from them. They are not considerate of giving quality vinyl wraps, they are considerate about completing their work by hook or crook.

For all the people who want to get high quality vinyl wrapping done on your cars, you should go to authentic vinyl wrap shops, even if their price is a bit high, because this price will one day be worthy.



Comentários



Chinese New Year
26/02/2016 às 03:19

Chinese New Year is an important Chinese festival celebrated at the turn of the traditional lunisolar Chinese calendar. It is also known as the Spring Festival, the literal translation of the modern Chinese name. Celebrations traditionally run from the evening preceding the first day, to the Lantern Festival on the 15th day of the first calendar month. The first day of the New Year falls on the new moon between 21 January and 20 February. In 2016, the first day of the Chinese New Year falls on Monday, 8 February.

The New Year festival is centuries old and gains significance because of several myths and traditions. Traditionally, the festival was a time to honour deities as well as ancestors. Chinese New Year is celebrated in countries and territories with significant Chinese populations, including Mainland China, Hong Kong, Macau, Taiwan, Singapore, Thailand, Cambodia, Indonesia, Malaysia, Mauritius, and the Philippines. Chinese New Year is considered a major holiday for the Chinese and has had influence on the lunar new year celebrations of its geographic neighbours.

Within China, regional customs and traditions concerning the celebration of the Chinese New Year vary widely. Often, the evening preceding Chinese New Year's Day is an occasion for Chinese families to gather for the annual reunion dinner. It is also traditional for every family to thoroughly cleanse the house, in order to sweep away any ill-fortune and to make way for good incoming luck. Windows and doors will be decorated with red color paper-cuts and couplets with popular themes of "good fortune" or "happiness", "wealth", and "longevity". Other activities include lighting firecrackers and giving money in red paper envelopes.

Although the Chinese calendar traditionally does not use continuously numbered years, outside China its years are often numbered from the reign of the 3rd millennium BCE Yellow Emperor. But at least three different years numbered 1 are now used by various scholars, making the year beginning CE 2015 the "Chinese year" 4713, 4712, or 4652.



Comentários



How to Reduce Glare when Driving at Night
23/02/2016 às 04:46

Driving at night can be a daunting task for new or even experienced drivers; the highest crash rates occur at nighttime (6:00 PM - 6:00 AM). Additionally, traffic fatality rates are three to four times greater at night than during the daytime. Part of this comes from the likelihood that drivers are driving when tired, stressed or under the influence of drugs or alcohol[1] You can reduce the dangers by making sure you have as few risk factors as possible, and can see as easily as possible. At night, our vision is more limited (low lights decrease depth perception and peripheral vision and cause the pupils to dilate, often blurring vision), and glare from the headlights of other vehicles can temporarily blind you. Glare is particularly invasive since it can cause temporary blindness, dizziness, and confusion.

Fortunately, there are several ways to reduce and handle glare through the use of specific techniques, strategies, and equipment.

 

Steps

  1. 1
    Check your car before you start to drive. Especially if you are going to be driving toward the sun or after dark, before you put the car in gear, take a few moments to determine if you need to do some spot cleaning. Keep window cleaner and paper towels in the car so you can deal with this whenever you need to.
Clean the windshield, windows, and glass surfaces. This includes the car's mirrors. Any streaks, road grime, or smudges on the glass scatter light, reducing the contrast of objects on the roadway and consequently can make them appear invisible[2]. Also, clean the inside of the windshield, because plastic chemicals can slowly build up on the glass. Clean the wiper blades using a paper towel and windshield washer fluid to remove the grime and oxidized rubber from the edge of the blade. This helps prevent streaks. If there are still streaks, you will probably need to get new blades. If there are any chips or cracks in your windshield, have them repaired immediately.

Clean the car's headlights. Even small amounts of dirt on the lamp can reduce the light output by half and restrict your ability to see and be seen. This is especially true if you have HID (High-Intensity Discharge) lights, because dirt diffuses the light from the lamp, causing glare that can be blinding to other drivers. If/when you have an annual inspection or you have a check-up at a dealer, car mechanic, or repair shop, have your headlights aligned. At least half of the vehicles on the road have an improperly aimed headlight and sometimes even both are misaligned. Properly aligned headlights will not only help you see better, but they will also keep you from casting the glare on other drivers. Older vehicles can improve headlight illumination/transmission efficiency by lapping or polishing the exterior of the headlights. As a result of exposure to road dirt, sand and road debris, the exterior of the headlights can become crazed, pitted and dull. Most auto parts suppliers carry a "lapping/polishing compound" specifically designed for headlight exteriors.

Adjust the car mirrors properly. The American Automobile Association (AAA) recommends this method for setting your mirrors: Lean to the left and rest your head against the window and adjust the driver side mirror so that you can just see the left rear corner of your vehicle. Then, lean to the right to the center of the vehicle and adjust your passenger side mirror until the right rear corner of the vehicle is just visible. This mirror setting reduces glare, blind spots, and makes it easier to identify vehicles on the side and rear. (Of course, if you are in a country where you must drive on the left side of the road - reverse the above directions.)

Have your vision checked regularly. According to the American Optometric Association, everyone under age 60 should have an eye exam at least every two years, and annually after the age of 60. [3] The older you are, the more sensitive your eyes become, but medical conditions associated with your eyes can also severely amplify the problem. If identified early, you may be able to get adequate treatment. If you have any glasses or contact lenses, make sure they are clean and scratch-free. Scratched and dirty glasses make glare worse.
  • Almost one in three drivers reports difficulty seeing when driving at night.[4] Raise any particular concerns you have with your eye specialist.
  • Check regularly that your prescription glasses or contact lenses are up-to-date. Your eye specialist can help confirm this for you.

 

Avoid looking directly at the headlights of oncoming traffic. Instead, look down and to the right. You should be able to gaze at the white line on the side of the road or where the pavement meets the shoulder. Use the right side of the road for tracking your lane instead of the left side. You will still be able to see other vehicles with your peripheral vision, but the glare won't bother you as much. Reverse these directions if you are driving in a country with left-hand traffic.

Flip the rearview mirror. You can change the mirror to its night setting by flipping a small lever at the bottom of the mirror. Lights will still appear in the glass, but they will appear much dimmer and therefore not be as bothersome.

ake frequent breaks if you're driving at night for extended periods of time. Having a break reduces fatigue and gives your eyes recovery time. You should also take a short nap or a brisk walk to keep alert.

Tips

  • Slow down when driving on winding or rolling roads at night. A sudden flash of headlights coming around a corner or over a crest can blind you and take you by surprise. If you're driving slowly, you'll have time to correct your surprised reactions or simply stick to your winding course safely.
  • If these tips are failing you, try to drive less at night or drive only on routes that have overhead roadway lighting and clear pavement markings. Another alternative is to have someone else drive who has better eyesight at night, or have a passenger who is ready to help warn you of things you might be missing.
  • There are self-dimming mirrors available from some dealers and automobile parts stores that reduce glare but allow for excellent visibility. These mirrors become darker as glare becomes brighter and lighter when glare diminishes.
  • If you wear glasses, try getting a pair with an anti-reflective coating that reduces internal reflections in the lenses. These lenses do not block light––they transmit 8 percent more light–and improve night vision. Such glasses even help to distinguish very fine details during the daytime.
  • Some plastic headlight diffusers become cloudy and hazy in time and drastically reduce headlight brilliance and cause a yellowish color. There are products made to clean plexiglass boat windshields that clean the haze off easily. Apply a dab with a bare finger and rub it randomly until almost dry then polish it off with a cotton cloth (do not use microfiber or paper; they will eventually leave scratch marks).

Warnings

  • Avoid using "night" driving glasses (sometimes labeled with the word "polarized"), which are tinted and supposedly block glare. In reality, these glasses reduce the amount of light you perceive, meaning they reduce your night vision overall, not just glare.
  • An eye condition called astigmatism can make night driving difficult. Speak with your eye care specialist for advice. They may recommend hydrating your eyes periodically at night.
  • Don't install imitation HID lights, these are just tinted halogen headlights that usually provide less light than regular bulbs because of their tint. Instead, either use real HID lights or the lights recommended by the vehicle's manufacturer.
  • Never wear sunglasses at night. They restrict night vision, and as you get used to them, they will be less efficient for daytime protection.

Sources and Citations

  1. Pennsylvania Driver's Manual. Accessed 29 February 2012.
  2. National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA)
  3. http://www.aoa.org/patients-and-public/good-vision-throughout-life?sso=y
  4. http://www.mlive.com/behealthy/index.ssf/2009/10/have_trouble_driving_at_night.html


Comentários



Window Tint Laws
17/02/2016 às 01:50

Vehicle window tinting is almost always regulated under state law, and the applicable statutes can usually be found in a state's vehicle or traffic code. The applicable vehicle code section in your state may discuss vehicle window tinting as "Material Obstructing or Reducing Driver's View" (in California), "Windshields and windows obscured by non-transparent materials" (in Massachusetts), or "Sun-shading or tinting films or applications" (in Virginia).

Your state's vehicle code may consider "window tinting" to include:

  • Heat-shrinking a tinted sheet of film to a vehicle's windshield or window, usually on the inside surface of the glass. This is usually done "after-market."
  • "Shade bands," usually meaning a thin, horizontal strip of tint at the top of a vehicle's windshield, where it meets the vehicle roof.
  • Sunscreen devices that are temporarily affixed to the inside surface of a vehicle's windshield, side windows, or rear window (i.e. a plastic shade device on a passenger side window, held in place with suction cups).

Most state laws on vehicle window tinting are concerned mainly with the levels of "light transmittance" or "luminous reflectance" that the vehicle's safety glass allows -- meaning how much light can get through and how much visibility the glass allows. So, if the windows on a vehicle are tinted to such a degree that the amount of light that can come through is below the amount identified under state law (i.e. 75% light transmittance), then the vehicle does not comply with the state's vehicle code, and the vehicle's owner will be issued a citation. Many state vehicle codes contain different light transmittance requirements for the vehicle's front windshield, when compared with standards for the vehicle's side and rear windows.

Finally, most state vehicle codes specify that no vehicle windshield or window may contain opaque or mirrored material, or "one-way" glass.

Vehicle window tinting is almost always regulated under state law, and the applicable statutes can usually be found in a state's vehicle or traffic code. The applicable vehicle code section in your state may discuss vehicle window tinting as "Material Obstructing or Reducing Driver's View" (in California), "Windshields and windows obscured by non-transparent materials" (in Massachusetts), or "Sun-shading or tinting films or applications" (in Virginia).

Your state's vehicle code may consider "window tinting" to include:

  • Heat-shrinking a tinted sheet of film to a vehicle's windshield or window, usually on the inside surface of the glass. This is usually done "after-market."
  • "Shade bands," usually meaning a thin, horizontal strip of tint at the top of a vehicle's windshield, where it meets the vehicle roof.
  • Sunscreen devices that are temporarily affixed to the inside surface of a vehicle's windshield, side windows, or rear window (i.e. a plastic shade device on a passenger side window, held in place with suction cups).

Most state laws on vehicle window tinting are concerned mainly with the levels of "light transmittance" or "luminous reflectance" that the vehicle's safety glass allows -- meaning how much light can get through and how much visibility the glass allows. So, if the windows on a vehicle are tinted to such a degree that the amount of light that can come through is below the amount identified under state law (i.e. 75% light transmittance), then the vehicle does not comply with the state's vehicle code, and the vehicle's owner will be issued a citation. Many state vehicle codes contain different light transmittance requirements for the vehicle's front windshield, when compared with standards for the vehicle's side and rear windows.

Finally, most state vehicle codes specify that no vehicle windshield or window may contain opaque or mirrored material, or "one-way" glass.

- See more at: http://traffic.findlaw.com/traffic-tickets/window-tint-laws-the-basics.html#sthash.gqMoSmbl.dpuf

Vehicle window tinting is almost always regulated under state law, and the applicable statutes can usually be found in a state's vehicle or traffic code. The applicable vehicle code section in your state may discuss vehicle window tinting as "Material Obstructing or Reducing Driver's View" (in California), "Windshields and windows obscured by non-transparent materials" (in Massachusetts), or "Sun-shading or tinting films or applications" (in Virginia).

Your state's vehicle code may consider "window tinting" to include:

  • Heat-shrinking a tinted sheet of film to a vehicle's windshield or window, usually on the inside surface of the glass. This is usually done "after-market."
  • "Shade bands," usually meaning a thin, horizontal strip of tint at the top of a vehicle's windshield, where it meets the vehicle roof.
  • Sunscreen devices that are temporarily affixed to the inside surface of a vehicle's windshield, side windows, or rear window (i.e. a plastic shade device on a passenger side window, held in place with suction cups).

Most state laws on vehicle window tinting are concerned mainly with the levels of "light transmittance" or "luminous reflectance" that the vehicle's safety glass allows -- meaning how much light can get through and how much visibility the glass allows. So, if the windows on a vehicle are tinted to such a degree that the amount of light that can come through is below the amount identified under state law (i.e. 75% light transmittance), then the vehicle does not comply with the state's vehicle code, and the vehicle's owner will be issued a citation. Many state vehicle codes contain different light transmittance requirements for the vehicle's front windshield, when compared with standards for the vehicle's side and rear windows.

Finally, most state vehicle codes specify that no vehicle windshield or window may contain opaque or mirrored material, or "one-way" glass.

- See more at: http://traffic.findlaw.com/traffic-tickets/window-tint-laws-the-basics.html#sthash.gqMoSmbl.dpuf

Vehicle window tinting is almost always regulated under state law, and the applicable statutes can usually be found in a state's vehicle or traffic code. The applicable vehicle code section in your state may discuss vehicle window tinting as "Material Obstructing or Reducing Driver's View" (in California), "Windshields and windows obscured by non-transparent materials" (in Massachusetts), or "Sun-shading or tinting films or applications" (in Virginia).

Your state's vehicle code may consider "window tinting" to include:

  • Heat-shrinking a tinted sheet of film to a vehicle's windshield or window, usually on the inside surface of the glass. This is usually done "after-market."
  • "Shade bands," usually meaning a thin, horizontal strip of tint at the top of a vehicle's windshield, where it meets the vehicle roof.
  • Sunscreen devices that are temporarily affixed to the inside surface of a vehicle's windshield, side windows, or rear window (i.e. a plastic shade device on a passenger side window, held in place with suction cups).

Most state laws on vehicle window tinting are concerned mainly with the levels of "light transmittance" or "luminous reflectance" that the vehicle's safety glass allows -- meaning how much light can get through and how much visibility the glass allows. So, if the windows on a vehicle are tinted to such a degree that the amount of light that can come through is below the amount identified under state law (i.e. 75% light transmittance), then the vehicle does not comply with the state's vehicle code, and the vehicle's owner will be issued a citation. Many state vehicle codes contain different light transmittance requirements for the vehicle's front windshield, when compared with standards for the vehicle's side and rear windows.

Finally, most state vehicle codes specify that no vehicle windshield or window may contain opaque or mirrored material, or "one-way" glass.

- See more at: http://traffic.findlaw.com/traffic-tickets/window-tint-laws-the-basics.html#sthash.gqMoSmbl.dpuf

Vehicle window tinting is almost always regulated under state law, and the applicable statutes can usually be found in a state's vehicle or traffic code. The applicable vehicle code section in your state may discuss vehicle window tinting as "Material Obstructing or Reducing Driver's View" (in California), "Windshields and windows obscured by non-transparent materials" (in Massachusetts), or "Sun-shading or tinting films or applications" (in Virginia).

Your state's vehicle code may consider "window tinting" to include:

  • Heat-shrinking a tinted sheet of film to a vehicle's windshield or window, usually on the inside surface of the glass. This is usually done "after-market."
  • "Shade bands," usually meaning a thin, horizontal strip of tint at the top of a vehicle's windshield, where it meets the vehicle roof.
  • Sunscreen devices that are temporarily affixed to the inside surface of a vehicle's windshield, side windows, or rear window (i.e. a plastic shade device on a passenger side window, held in place with suction cups).

Most state laws on vehicle window tinting are concerned mainly with the levels of "light transmittance" or "luminous reflectance" that the vehicle's safety glass allows -- meaning how much light can get through and how much visibility the glass allows. So, if the windows on a vehicle are tinted to such a degree that the amount of light that can come through is below the amount identified under state law (i.e. 75% light transmittance), then the vehicle does not comply with the state's vehicle code, and the vehicle's owner will be issued a citation. Many state vehicle codes contain different light transmittance requirements for the vehicle's front windshield, when compared with standards for the vehicle's side and rear windows.

Finally, most state vehicle codes specify that no vehicle windshield or window may contain opaque or mirrored material, or "one-way" glass.

- See more at: http://traffic.findlaw.com/traffic-tickets/window-tint-laws-the-basics.html#sthash.gqMoSmbl.dpuf

Vehicle window tinting is almost always regulated under state law, and the applicable statutes can usually be found in a state's vehicle or traffic code. The applicable vehicle code section in your state may discuss vehicle window tinting as "Material Obstructing or Reducing Driver's View" (in California), "Windshields and windows obscured by non-transparent materials" (in Massachusetts), or "Sun-shading or tinting films or applications" (in Virginia).

Your state's vehicle code may consider "window tinting" to include:

  • Heat-shrinking a tinted sheet of film to a vehicle's windshield or window, usually on the inside surface of the glass. This is usually done "after-market."
  • "Shade bands," usually meaning a thin, horizontal strip of tint at the top of a vehicle's windshield, where it meets the vehicle roof.
  • Sunscreen devices that are temporarily affixed to the inside surface of a vehicle's windshield, side windows, or rear window (i.e. a plastic shade device on a passenger side window, held in place with suction cups).

Most state laws on vehicle window tinting are concerned mainly with the levels of "light transmittance" or "luminous reflectance" that the vehicle's safety glass allows -- meaning how much light can get through and how much visibility the glass allows. So, if the windows on a vehicle are tinted to such a degree that the amount of light that can come through is below the amount identified under state law (i.e. 75% light transmittance), then the vehicle does not comply with the state's vehicle code, and the vehicle's owner will be issued a citation. Many state vehicle codes contain different light transmittance requirements for the vehicle's front windshield, when compared with standards for the vehicle's side and rear windows.

Finally, most state vehicle codes specify that no vehicle windshield or window may contain opaque or mirrored material, or "one-way" glass.

- See more at: http://traffic.findlaw.com/traffic-tickets/window-tint-laws-the-basics.html#sthash.gqMoSmbl.dpuf

Vehicle window tinting is almost always regulated under state law, and the applicable statutes can usually be found in a state's vehicle or traffic code. The applicable vehicle code section in your state may discuss vehicle window tinting as "Material Obstructing or Reducing Driver's View" (in California), "Windshields and windows obscured by non-transparent materials" (in Massachusetts), or "Sun-shading or tinting films or applications" (in Virginia).

Your state's vehicle code may consider "window tinting" to include:

  • Heat-shrinking a tinted sheet of film to a vehicle's windshield or window, usually on the inside surface of the glass. This is usually done "after-market."
  • "Shade bands," usually meaning a thin, horizontal strip of tint at the top of a vehicle's windshield, where it meets the vehicle roof.
  • Sunscreen devices that are temporarily affixed to the inside surface of a vehicle's windshield, side windows, or rear window (i.e. a plastic shade device on a passenger side window, held in place with suction cups).

Most state laws on vehicle window tinting are concerned mainly with the levels of "light transmittance" or "luminous reflectance" that the vehicle's safety glass allows -- meaning how much light can get through and how much visibility the glass allows. So, if the windows on a vehicle are tinted to such a degree that the amount of light that can come through is below the amount identified under state law (i.e. 75% light transmittance), then the vehicle does not comply with the state's vehicle code, and the vehicle's owner will be issued a citation. Many state vehicle codes contain different light transmittance requirements for the vehicle's front windshield, when compared with standards for the vehicle's side and rear windows.

Finally, most state vehicle codes specify that no vehicle windshield or window may contain opaque or mirrored material, or "one-way" glass.

- See more at: http://traffic.findlaw.com/traffic-tickets/window-tint-laws-the-basics.html#sthash.gqMoSmbl.dpuf


Comentários



Window Tint Laws
17/02/2016 às 01:35

Vehicle window tinting is almost always regulated under state law, and the applicable statutes can usually be found in a state's vehicle or traffic code. The applicable vehicle code section in your state may discuss vehicle window tinting as "Material Obstructing or Reducing Driver's View" (in California), "Windshields and windows obscured by non-transparent materials" (in Massachusetts), or "Sun-shading or tinting films or applications" (in Virginia).

Your state's vehicle code may consider "window tinting" to include:

  • Heat-shrinking a tinted sheet of film to a vehicle's windshield or window, usually on the inside surface of the glass. This is usually done "after-market."
  • "Shade bands," usually meaning a thin, horizontal strip of tint at the top of a vehicle's windshield, where it meets the vehicle roof.
  • Sunscreen devices that are temporarily affixed to the inside surface of a vehicle's windshield, side windows, or rear window (i.e. a plastic shade device on a passenger side window, held in place with suction cups).

Most state laws on vehicle window tinting are concerned mainly with the levels of "light transmittance" or "luminous reflectance" that the vehicle's safety glass allows -- meaning how much light can get through and how much visibility the glass allows. So, if the windows on a vehicle are tinted to such a degree that the amount of light that can come through is below the amount identified under state law (i.e. 75% light transmittance), then the vehicle does not comply with the state's vehicle code, and the vehicle's owner will be issued a citation. Many state vehicle codes contain different light transmittance requirements for the vehicle's front windshield, when compared with standards for the vehicle's side and rear windows.

Finally, most state vehicle codes specify that no vehicle windshield or window may contain opaque or mirrored material, or "one-way" glass.

- See more at: http://traffic.findlaw.com/traffic-tickets/window-tint-laws-the-basics.html#sthash.gqMoSmbl.dpuf

Vehicle window tinting is almost always regulated under state law, and the applicable statutes can usually be found in a state's vehicle or traffic code. The applicable vehicle code section in your state may discuss vehicle window tinting as "Material Obstructing or Reducing Driver's View" (in California), "Windshields and windows obscured by non-transparent materials" (in Massachusetts), or "Sun-shading or tinting films or applications" (in Virginia).

Your state's vehicle code may consider "window tinting" to include:

  • Heat-shrinking a tinted sheet of film to a vehicle's windshield or window, usually on the inside surface of the glass. This is usually done "after-market."
  • "Shade bands," usually meaning a thin, horizontal strip of tint at the top of a vehicle's windshield, where it meets the vehicle roof.
  • Sunscreen devices that are temporarily affixed to the inside surface of a vehicle's windshield, side windows, or rear window (i.e. a plastic shade device on a passenger side window, held in place with suction cups).

Most state laws on vehicle window tinting are concerned mainly with the levels of "light transmittance" or "luminous reflectance" that the vehicle's safety glass allows -- meaning how much light can get through and how much visibility the glass allows. So, if the windows on a vehicle are tinted to such a degree that the amount of light that can come through is below the amount identified under state law (i.e. 75% light transmittance), then the vehicle does not comply with the state's vehicle code, and the vehicle's owner will be issued a citation. Many state vehicle codes contain different light transmittance requirements for the vehicle's front windshield, when compared with standards for the vehicle's side and rear windows.

Finally, most state vehicle codes specify that no vehicle windshield or window may contain opaque or mirrored material, or "one-way" glass.

- See more at: http://traffic.findlaw.com/traffic-tickets/window-tint-laws-the-basics.html#sthash.gqMoSmbl.dpuf

Vehicle window tinting is almost always regulated under state law, and the applicable statutes can usually be found in a state's vehicle or traffic code. The applicable vehicle code section in your state may discuss vehicle window tinting as "Material Obstructing or Reducing Driver's View" (in California), "Windshields and windows obscured by non-transparent materials" (in Massachusetts), or "Sun-shading or tinting films or applications" (in Virginia).

Your state's vehicle code may consider "window tinting" to include:

  • Heat-shrinking a tinted sheet of film to a vehicle's windshield or window, usually on the inside surface of the glass. This is usually done "after-market."
  • "Shade bands," usually meaning a thin, horizontal strip of tint at the top of a vehicle's windshield, where it meets the vehicle roof.
  • Sunscreen devices that are temporarily affixed to the inside surface of a vehicle's windshield, side windows, or rear window (i.e. a plastic shade device on a passenger side window, held in place with suction cups).

Most state laws on vehicle window tinting are concerned mainly with the levels of "light transmittance" or "luminous reflectance" that the vehicle's safety glass allows -- meaning how much light can get through and how much visibility the glass allows. So, if the windows on a vehicle are tinted to such a degree that the amount of light that can come through is below the amount identified under state law (i.e. 75% light transmittance), then the vehicle does not comply with the state's vehicle code, and the vehicle's owner will be issued a citation. Many state vehicle codes contain different light transmittance requirements for the vehicle's front windshield, when compared with standards for the vehicle's side and rear windows.

Finally, most state vehicle codes specify that no vehicle windshield or window may contain opaque or mirrored material, or "one-way" glass.

- See more at: http://traffic.findlaw.com/traffic-tickets/window-tint-laws-the-basics.html#sthash.gqMoSmbl.dpuf

Vehicle window tinting is almost always regulated under state law, and the applicable statutes can usually be found in a state's vehicle or traffic code. The applicable vehicle code section in your state may discuss vehicle window tinting as "Material Obstructing or Reducing Driver's View" (in California), "Windshields and windows obscured by non-transparent materials" (in Massachusetts), or "Sun-shading or tinting films or applications" (in Virginia).

Your state's vehicle code may consider "window tinting" to include:

  • Heat-shrinking a tinted sheet of film to a vehicle's windshield or window, usually on the inside surface of the glass. This is usually done "after-market."
  • "Shade bands," usually meaning a thin, horizontal strip of tint at the top of a vehicle's windshield, where it meets the vehicle roof.
  • Sunscreen devices that are temporarily affixed to the inside surface of a vehicle's windshield, side windows, or rear window (i.e. a plastic shade device on a passenger side window, held in place with suction cups).

Most state laws on vehicle window tinting are concerned mainly with the levels of "light transmittance" or "luminous reflectance" that the vehicle's safety glass allows -- meaning how much light can get through and how much visibility the glass allows. So, if the windows on a vehicle are tinted to such a degree that the amount of light that can come through is below the amount identified under state law (i.e. 75% light transmittance), then the vehicle does not comply with the state's vehicle code, and the vehicle's owner will be issued a citation. Many state vehicle codes contain different light transmittance requirements for the vehicle's front windshield, when compared with standards for the vehicle's side and rear windows.

Finally, most state vehicle codes specify that no vehicle windshield or window may contain opaque or mirrored material, or "one-way" glass.

- See more at: http://traffic.findlaw.com/traffic-tickets/window-tint-laws-the-basics.html#sthash.gqMoSmbl.dpuf

Vehicle window tinting is almost always regulated under state law, and the applicable statutes can usually be found in a state's vehicle or traffic code. The applicable vehicle code section in your state may discuss vehicle window tinting as "Material Obstructing or Reducing Driver's View" (in California), "Windshields and windows obscured by non-transparent materials" (in Massachusetts), or "Sun-shading or tinting films or applications" (in Virginia).

Your state's vehicle code may consider "window tinting" to include:

  • Heat-shrinking a tinted sheet of film to a vehicle's windshield or window, usually on the inside surface of the glass. This is usually done "after-market."
  • "Shade bands," usually meaning a thin, horizontal strip of tint at the top of a vehicle's windshield, where it meets the vehicle roof.
  • Sunscreen devices that are temporarily affixed to the inside surface of a vehicle's windshield, side windows, or rear window (i.e. a plastic shade device on a passenger side window, held in place with suction cups).

Most state laws on vehicle window tinting are concerned mainly with the levels of "light transmittance" or "luminous reflectance" that the vehicle's safety glass allows -- meaning how much light can get through and how much visibility the glass allows. So, if the windows on a vehicle are tinted to such a degree that the amount of light that can come through is below the amount identified under state law (i.e. 75% light transmittance), then the vehicle does not comply with the state's vehicle code, and the vehicle's owner will be issued a citation. Many state vehicle codes contain different light transmittance requirements for the vehicle's front windshield, when compared with standards for the vehicle's side and rear windows.

Finally, most state vehicle codes specify that no vehicle windshield or window may contain opaque or mirrored material, or "one-way" glass.

- See more at: http://traffic.findlaw.com/traffic-tickets/window-tint-laws-the-basics.html#sthash.gqMoSmbl.dpuf

Vehicle window tinting is almost always regulated under state law, and the applicable statutes can usually be found in a state's vehicle or traffic code. The applicable vehicle code section in your state may discuss vehicle window tinting as "Material Obstructing or Reducing Driver's View" (in California), "Windshields and windows obscured by non-transparent materials" (in Massachusetts), or "Sun-shading or tinting films or applications" (in Virginia).

Your state's vehicle code may consider "window tinting" to include:

  • Heat-shrinking a tinted sheet of film to a vehicle's windshield or window, usually on the inside surface of the glass. This is usually done "after-market."
  • "Shade bands," usually meaning a thin, horizontal strip of tint at the top of a vehicle's windshield, where it meets the vehicle roof.
  • Sunscreen devices that are temporarily affixed to the inside surface of a vehicle's windshield, side windows, or rear window (i.e. a plastic shade device on a passenger side window, held in place with suction cups).

Most state laws on vehicle window tinting are concerned mainly with the levels of "light transmittance" or "luminous reflectance" that the vehicle's safety glass allows -- meaning how much light can get through and how much visibility the glass allows. So, if the windows on a vehicle are tinted to such a degree that the amount of light that can come through is below the amount identified under state law (i.e. 75% light transmittance), then the vehicle does not comply with the state's vehicle code, and the vehicle's owner will be issued a citation. Many state vehicle codes contain different light transmittance requirements for the vehicle's front windshield, when compared with standards for the vehicle's side and rear windows.

Finally, most state vehicle codes specify that no vehicle windshield or window may contain opaque or mirrored material, or "one-way" glass.

- See more at: http://traffic.findlaw.com/traffic-tickets/window-tint-laws-the-basics.html#sthash.gqMoSmbl.dpuf


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Car WIndow Tinting Tips For Beginners
30/01/2016 às 05:03

Car Window Tinting is one of the most frustrating skills to learn, it can take years and years of practice and patience and perseverance to even get to the point where you can produce good quality work that customer would be happy to pay for. So what things can you do to improve on the look and finish of your car window tinting projects.

Cleaning is a vital part of any successful car window tinting installation, I really do suggest you invest in some foaming glass cleaner, in the USA a good branded Product is from Sprayway , in the UK you can source the Wurth  brand of foaming active glass cleaner, it can be expensive to buy single cans if you are not doing much car window tinting but  I like to buy in batches of 24, I know this is quite an outlay but if you are serious about making a career out of car window tinting then you need the right products to work with.

Also needed is some good quality masking tape, again the more prominent brand names do seem to have better adhesion, personally I use 3M masking tape and I get this from a local body shop supply company,

If the vehicle in question has felt seals which surround the window make sure before you even start anything else that you tape of these felt seals with your masking tape, this. Any felt or contamination can be forced out into your installation if you don’t tape of those felt seals!



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How to Clean Your Car Headlights
29/01/2016 às 03:22

It doesn't matter how fast your car is, you can only drive as fast as you can see down the road ahead of you. When the plastic lenses on your headlights get hazy and oxidized, they disperse the light and reduce your visibility. Here’s how to clean them.

Do one headlight at a time. Start by washing the lens and surrounding area completely using dish detergent. Normally you'd avoid harsh detergent because it strips your car’s wax and dries out the paint, but that's what you need in this case. Rinse and allow to dry completely.

Apply painter's tape to the car's body around the headlight, making sure to cover the rubber seal around the headlight (if there is one). Apply more tape for a wider margin of safety. Use a rubber spatula to press the tape down and work it into the crevices around the light. Use a razor to trim away excess tape where the rubber seal meets the lens.

Wrap a strip of 500-grit sandpaper around a foam sanding block or large sponge. The foam helps distribute pressure on the sandpaper so you don’t leave deep gouges in the lens.

Press the sandpaper-wrapped block to the headlight lens, and start sanding the lens in a back-and-forth motion. Every 10 seconds or so, switch the direction of sanding. This straight-line, alternating-stroke method avoids putting circular swirls in the plastic, which will show in the finished product.

Keep sanding until the surface is uniformly frosty and completely opaque. Keep sanding until it feels as silky smooth as sanded pinewood.

Wipe the headlight down with a microfiber cloth to check your work. Be sure you adequately sanded edges and corners. When you're satisfied, rinse the headlight with clean water.

Fill a gallon pitcher with water. Add dish detergent and drop in a few pieces of 1000- and 2000-grit sandpaper to soak.

Fill a spray bottle with soapy water from the pitcher and heavily mist your headlight. Wrap the foam block 1000-grit sandpaper and sand the headlight just as you did with the 500-grit. Keeping the spray bottle in your other hand, give the lens a fresh spray every time you change sanding directions. Keep it wet and slippery.

Sand until the paper slides smoothly over the headlight lens and you can't feel any rough spots. Rinse and dry the lens, preferably with compressed air. Look at the lens from an angle. If you see irregularities, re-wet the lens and keep sanding with a fresh piece of wet sandpaper.

Wash, rinse, and repeat with 2000-grit paper. Rinse and dry the lens completely when you're finished. The lens should be almost uniformly clear (with some slight hazing).

Fold a microfiber polishing rag into quarters. If you're using liquid headlight polish, run a thick line of polish along the top of the headlight. If you're using a paste-type plastic polish, load your rag up with about an ounce and smear it all over the lens.

Work the polish all over the lens until it’s covered uniformly, then add a bit more polish to your rag. Polish the lens with medium pressure, using the same method you used while sanding. Make complete passes over the lens, polishing in one direction; then flip the rag over to a cleaner side for another pass. The longer you polish, the better the result will be. Keep going until the surface feels completely smooth and uniform. Note: This will take much longer than you expect it to.

Wash the headlight with detergent water, rinse thoroughly, and allow to dry completely. Wipe the lens down with rubbing alcohol and a clean, lint-free towel. Spray with lens sealer and wipe it with a lint-free towel as directed by the sealer packaging.

Step back to admire your work. With the lens completely clear and smooth, and the sealer filling in any minor imperfections to form a perfect, glass-like sheen, your headlight should glitter, jewel-like, in the sun. Now repeat all of these steps on the other headlight.

In addtion,I recommend you a useful towel that you will need when clean your car heahlights:White Scrub Pad for Glass CleaningWhite Scrub Pad for Glass Cleaninghttp://www.china-caright.us/cleaning-pads-and-cloths/white-scrub-pad-for-glass-cleaning-p-107677.html

Finally, I hope these advice will be useful for you.Thank you for your reading



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1.5L High-density Pressure Spray with Graduation
29/01/2016 às 03:12

Imagem bloqueada!

This spray bottle get a design with an extended nozzle to reach those tricky gaps and overall durability have this pump-up

sprayer becoming a window film industry favorite. Hard wearing and long lasting.



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Blue Window Tinting Hard Card Sharpener
25/01/2016 às 06:49

This sharpening tool is quite necessary for maintaining squeegee or scraper with sharp, hard or smooth edges such as the Teflons. Jusr use a few part of a stainless steel blade to replace with a screw driver underneath. This hard card sharpener is an amazing tool which works like a wood plane. Imagem bloqueada!



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Tips for Decorative Window Film
25/01/2016 às 06:48

Window film is often considered a necessity, not least by those who already have it installed. It’s not hard to see why, either  - just take a look at a few of the great benefits it can provide:
 

  •  Reduces energy costs
  •  Eliminates nasty window glare
  • Preserves the color of carpets and furniture
  •  Acts as a shatter safety mechanism in case the window breaks


What many people don’t know (or haven’t considered) about window film, however, is that you can use it for stunning decorative purposes, too.

Get ready to learn about some of the best and most creative ways to use decorative window film in your home:

1. Easily get that unique stained-glass look

That’s right, you can actually turn an ordinary window into a stunning stained glass look-alike, with no easy way to tell the difference! The options for stained glass window films are vast, and unlike real stained glass, it doesn’t cost a fortune to make or install. Real stained glass can also be a real pain to install, which makes decorative window film a relatively effortless and highly cost-effective alternative.

2. Protect your sliding glass door (and yourself) from accidents

Clean and spotless sliding glass doors can be a double-edged sword, as anyone who has ever walked into one by accident will know. And don’t make the mistake of thinking it won’t happen to you – even dogs and cats with their sharp eyesight can be fooled by clear glass doors. Decorative window film can help you protect the door itself as well as your family and guests.

3. Improve your sleep in the daytime

For those times when you just need to take a nap at home, window tint can make all the difference between a restful snooze and an uncomfortable, fitful one. For those who work during the night time, this can be a lifesaver. No longer will you have to stuff your windows with foil or blankets – use block-patterned decorative window film to lower the intensity and amount of light that enters your room. It’s certainly a lot more classy than the alternatives!
4. Beautify your children’s rooms
There is an amazing variety of different designs and types of decorative window film for children’s rooms. Look around and you will find decorative film suitable for kids of all ages, ranging from complete murals to your child’s favorite cartoon characters, and more.
5. Turn extra windows into works of art
Oftentimes when renovating and extending living spaces, homeowners are left with unwanted or unnecessary windows between new rooms. Now you can easily take advantage of the extra window by decorating it instead of removing it, which can be a real hassle. It is even possible to find matching decorative window film to suit the overall look and feel of the room in question.
6. Get fancy with flower film for your façade
Make your façade more attractive by adding a nice flowery film design to your front-facing windows. There are many of these types of window film available, which means you’ll easily find something you like if flowers are your thing.
7. Give your windows a coat of frost
A favorite of decorators and homeowners everywhere, frosted window film can even be combined with interesting designs like pictures of flowers and other cool symbols that are sure to make your neighbors envious.
8. Stay stylish while guarding your privacy
Decorative window film can double as an attractive design as well as a privacy barrier to peeping toms or potential burglars.  Regardless of your personal preference and style, there are a numbers of decorative film types to fit your needs.
9. Get edgy with etches
Real etched glass doesn’t come cheap, but some homeowners simply love the unique quality it adds to their houses. With a wide array of faux etched glass window film, you can get the best of both worlds: an edgy etched look without the unbearable cost.
10. Keep your bathroom hidden
Transparent bathroom windows are the worst offenders in the ‘home annoyances’ category, which is why there’s a whole range of ripple glass window film designed specifically to keep your bathroom privacy protected.

Take a closer look at our great range of decorative films

If you’re excited about getting started with decorative film, take a look through our online catalog for the complete range of options available to you. TintCenter is able to provide partial film rolls (not pre-cut) while SnapTint offers customized pre-cut rolls to match your exact window requirements.



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Super-strong Auto Vinyl Wrap Magnet Auto Vinyl Wrap Positioning Tools
25/01/2016 às 06:46

Imagem bloqueada!

Today I recommend you a useful tinting tool for you. It gets a grip on your graphics and vinyls with this versatile Auto Vinyl Wrap Magnet is gorgeous. It is a strong neodymium magnet that helps pull keep vinyl firmly in place. With the long handle, you can reposition vinyl or graphics quickly and easily throughout the application process, saving time and money. Each includes a magnetic shield to prevent unwanted attraction of tools during storage. Also this Auto Vinyl Wrap Magnet includes non-scratch felt liners for extra cushion.



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Car Window Tinting Lint-free Super Prep Towel
22/01/2016 às 06:18

Imagem bloqueada!

Car Window Tinting Lint-free Super Prep Towel is a great high  quality paper towel for window film installations. These towels are very absorbent and practically lint free, making your cleaning and tinting jobs faster and easier.  It is not only durable and tough  enough to reuse, but also soft  enough to clean up windows.  You can also use these Super Prep Towels for covering hard cards when you bump your edges dry.



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22/01/2016 às 06:17



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Car Window films measurement
22/01/2016 às 06:15

Someone will ask, What is the best way to measure my windows for working out how much film I need? The best way to size up your windows is when you are using a measuring tape, measure the size of each individual window that requires window film from top of the frame to bottom, and side to side. You will only need the glass area and not the frame. Then simply enter the sizes into the pre-cut calculator and the cost will be automatically displayed when you add those sizes to your cart. You will only pay for what you need.



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22/01/2016 às 06:03



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Auto Tinting Scraper Gator Blade II Chizler Tool
21/10/2015 às 02:11

The “Gator Blade” is as sharp as they come, but won’t scratch or damage the film. Safer and easier to use than razors, the Gator Blade is fast becoming the favorite everywhere. This handy scraper can be sued for cleaning glass, removing excess adhesive and scraping off decals. Gator Blades are available in two unique shapes, both featuring an easy-grip ribbed construction that makes them easy to hang on to, and reduces installation fatigue.



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Window Tint Keeps Your car Cool from Inside to Outside
15/10/2015 às 03:20


Believe it or not, no one do not want his car stands out from the crowd. Window film can help you realize that crazy idea. With the clear and invisible window films, you car can be given an elegant look and scorching hot.


Actually, having window film professionally installed on your car not only get the look you want but the privacy you seek from the outside world.


From light to dark, various shades includes ceramic tint that maximizes heat and ultraviolet rejection. This kind of films keep you and your vehicle from the damaging effects of the sun, as well as create you a comfort privacy.


With an exclusive range of window tints sold on the market, you can choose a look for your car that completely complements your style. Also, you can choose basing on high performance and maximum UV protection.
 



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